It was among the many least welcome sights at a Seventies social gathering, together with Hirondelle wine and your good friend’s assortment of Boney M information.

However, to the possible dismay of many, Watneys Celebration Seven is making a comeback.

Regardless of being promoted in TV adverts by the likes of Michael Caine and Peter Prepare dinner, the massive purple and gold can was ridiculed on the time for the tasteless, fizzy ‘draught’ bitter inside.

It was additionally infamous for spraying beer everywhere in the kitchen when punctured with a tin-opener – or, in desperation, a screwdriver. That was except you wished to purchase a particular faucet that value the equal of £40 at immediately’s costs.

The barrel-shaped seven-pint can disappeared within the Eighties with the appearance of the six-pack – particular person ring-pull cans that have been continuously used as makeshift ashtrays – however is clearly nonetheless fondly remembered by some.

The excellent news for drinkers is that the brand new mini-keg, which comprises 5 litres, or 8.8 pints, incorporates a faucet to keep away from mess, whereas the makers promise the beer has been improved to mirror immediately’s style for craft ales.

It's back, but not as you know it: To the probable dismay of many, Watneys Party Seven beer is making a comeback in a new mini-keg, which contains 5 litres, or 8.8 pints, and incorporates a tap to avoid mess

It is again, however not as you realize it: To the possible dismay of many, Watneys Celebration Seven beer is making a comeback in a brand new mini-keg, which comprises 5 litres, or 8.8 pints, and incorporates a faucet to keep away from mess

It was among the least welcome sights at a Seventies party, along with Hirondelle wine and your friend's collection of Boney M records. Pictured: A 1970s Party Seven advertisement

It was among the many least welcome sights at a Seventies social gathering, together with Hirondelle wine and your good friend’s assortment of Boney M information. Pictured: A Nineteen Seventies Celebration Seven commercial

One fan of the new Party Seven is Daily Mail reader Justin Barry, 55, and wife Alison, 48, who said: 'It's quite nostalgic. It reminds me of going to Christmas parties in the 1970s. I remember following my dad as he carried a Party Seven under his arm'

One fan of the brand new Celebration Seven is Each day Mail reader Justin Barry, 55, and spouse Alison, 48, who stated: ‘It is fairly nostalgic. It jogs my memory of going to Christmas events within the Nineteen Seventies. I keep in mind following my dad as he carried a Celebration Seven below his arm’

Despite being promoted in TV adverts by the likes of Michael Caine (pictured) and Peter Cook, the large red and gold can was ridiculed at the time for the bland, fizzy 'draught' bitter inside

Regardless of being promoted in TV adverts by the likes of Michael Caine (pictured) and Peter Prepare dinner, the massive purple and gold can was ridiculed on the time for the tasteless, fizzy ‘draught’ bitter inside

Additionally it is stronger, with an ABV of 4.2 per cent reasonably than the unique 3 per cent.

Nevertheless, the sobering information is that the revamped Celebration Seven prices round £25 – in contrast with simply £1 in 1974.

It has been launched by Nick Whitehurst, who with two buddies helped revive the Watneys model 5 years in the past.

They started producing a spread of craft beers with names comparable to Sarcasm and Irony – to mirror Watneys’ earlier picture downside.

Beer critics who derided Celebration Seven within the Sixties and Seventies had been much more scathing about one other Watneys product, Crimson Barrel, a keg beer bought in pubs.

The rise of actual ale noticed the model fade from view, till Mr Whitehurst got here alongside.

Beer critics who derided Party Seven in the Sixties and Seventies had been even more scathing about another Watneys product, Red Barrel, a keg beer sold in pubs

Beer critics who derided Celebration Seven within the Sixties and Seventies had been much more scathing about one other Watneys product, Crimson Barrel, a keg beer bought in pubs

The Party Seven was famous the world over and was at the heart of millions of parties in the 1960s and 1970s

The Celebration Seven was well-known the world over and was on the coronary heart of tens of millions of events within the Sixties and Nineteen Seventies

Watney's Mortlake Brewery, seen here during the boat race of 1959. Pictured is a sign saying 'We Want Watneys'

Watney’s Mortlake Brewery, seen right here throughout the boat race of 1959. Pictured is an indication saying ‘We Need Watneys’

An authentic Watneys brewer, Philip Downes, 57, oversees manufacturing. Nevertheless, because the pub commerce has been hit onerous by the pandemic, for the second the brewery is concentrating on canned beer.

So Mr Whitehurst determined it was time to behave on solutions they convey again the Celebration Seven. He stated: ‘It is out of necessity after the remainder of our enterprise shut down in a single day final March.

‘We felt we could not quit on Watneys with out first making an attempt the Celebration Seven, given folks’s affection for it. We have heard so many anecdotes.

‘Many’s the story of outdated Celebration Sevens exploding and hitting the ceiling when folks tried to open them.

‘A number of folks keep in mind ingesting it at home events, get-togethers, music festivals and soccer away-days. We’re offering a hyperlink again to happier instances and it is also a visit down reminiscence lane for many individuals.

Watneys, the brewer behind the much derided bitter, was founded in 1837 but hit the heights of fame in the 1970s with Party Seven. Pictured: A landlady pours a pint of Watneys Red Barrel in 1965

Watneys, the brewer behind the a lot derided bitter, was based in 1837 however hit the heights of fame within the Nineteen Seventies with Celebration Seven. Pictured: A landlady pours a pint of Watneys Crimson Barrel in 1965

However, the beer's 'bland' and unmemorable taste was slammed by critics and saw the brand disappear in the 80s. Pictured: Peter Humphrey of Watneys in 1978

Nevertheless, the beer’s ‘bland’ and unmemorable style was slammed by critics and noticed the model disappear within the 80s. Pictured: Peter Humphrey of Watneys in 1978

The company brought out several different types of ale during the 1950s and 60s before hitting success with Party Seven. Pictured: Watneys Hammerton Stout Magazine Advert in the 1950s

The corporate introduced out a number of several types of ale throughout the Fifties and 60s earlier than hitting success with Celebration Seven. Pictured: Watneys Hammerton Stout Journal Advert within the Fifties

‘We heard from one man whose mother and father met as a result of they have been at a celebration when his father opened a Celebration Seven and it splashed over the girl subsequent to him. She grew to become his spouse.

‘We would like it to attraction to individuals who keep in mind ingesting it years in the past – however have up to date the elements so we will additionally attraction to a brand new crowd. Now we have been delighted with the suggestions we’ve had thus far.’

One fan of the brand new Celebration Seven is Each day Mail reader Justin Barry, 55. Firm director Mr Barry, from Allington, Lincolnshire, who loved ‘three or 4 kegs over Christmas’ with spouse Alison, 48, stated: ‘It is fairly nostalgic. It jogs my memory of going to Christmas events within the Nineteen Seventies. I keep in mind following my dad as he carried a Celebration Seven below his arm.

‘It is the subsequent smartest thing to a pint within the pub. I believe it’s going to catch on once we are allowed to have events as soon as once more. You additionally need to pour it right into a glass, so it seems like a correct pint.’

The brand new Celebration Sevens are produced on Merseyside and are on sale by way of www.party-seven.com.

What was Watneys Celebration Seven? 

Watneys, a London-based brewer since 1837, launched Celebration Seven on 21 October 1968, one of many first bulk containers for buying beer cheaply.

Although a lot ridiculed since, their plan was a wise one – to set themselves aside from the competitors by evoking the thought of a ‘social gathering drink’ – seven pints price in a single can.

It additionally complemented their smaller can, Celebration 4, which they’d been promoting since 1964.

However Celebration Seven was fast to attract consideration with its hefty purple and gold can, retailing in supermarkets for 15 shillings (or 75p). In immediately’s cash that might have been about £9.

It grew to become extremely common, particularly amongst youngsters within the Nineteen Seventies, when it gained its notoriety for ‘exploding’ everywhere in the kitchen at social gathering when the can was pierced. 

The choice to not embrace a ring-pull kind of attachment on the can has lengthy been questioned, with some suggesting the design of thicker metallic to face up to increased stress meant it could haven’t at all times labored. 

Partygoers as a substitute resorted to the a number of ingenious ‘can piercer’ strategies, together with a tin opener, a screw driver, and even a hammer and a nail.

You needed to be fast to puncture to holes within the can, one for the beer and one other for air to get in, or else face a ‘beer fountain’ that would cowl the partitions of your home. 

At Celebration Seven’s launch, Watneys supplied a specifically designed Sparklets beer faucet for 59 shillings and 9 pence, just below £40 in immediately’s cash.

Gross sales of beer in party-sized containers took off within the Nineteen Seventies, and in 1974 the UK Authorities added ‘beer in social gathering containers’ to the checklist of things used to make the RPI (Retail Worth Index) calculation. They eliminated it in 1987.

Sadly nonetheless, the beer’s ‘bland’ and unmemorable style was slammed by critics and noticed the model disappear within the 80s.

It returned to pubs in 2016 and was made utilizing spare capability in different craft brewers in London.  



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